LAND NAVIGATION DAY COURSE
(REFERENCE FM 3-25-26)

CONDITIONS: During daylight, in the field, the candidate is given a 1:50,000-scale military topographic map, a compass, a coordinate scale and protractor, a pencil, and the eight digit coordinates of the start point, the three intermediate points and the end point.

STANDARDS:  The candidate must plot the start, the three intermediate points, and the end point on the map.  He or she must then navigate the course using any navigational technique and record the position stake number for each point within 3 hours.  The following information must be annotated for record purposes:

1.  Start time.

2.  Start point grid coordinates.

3.  1st point coordinates and position stake number.

4.  2nd point grid coordinates and position stake number.

5.  3rd point grid coordinates and position stake number.

6.  4th point/end point grid coordinates and position stake number

7.  Stop time and elapsed time in hours and minutes.



Unfortunately, this lane of testing causes the greatest attrition during the whole test. In some instances, I have witnessed a 75% fail rate on land navigation The easiest way to combat this is find another soldier who is good at land navigation and ask them to help you.

Familiarize yourself with Field Manual 3-25.26, Map Reading and Land Navigation. Be proficient in the use of your compass and protractor. Know your pace count.

071-329-1006 Navigate From One Point on the Ground to Another Point While Dismounted Click Here

The day course has the following rules:

1. You must work alone. Any contact with other candidates, primarily talking, will cause you to fail.

2. You will receive four 8-digit grid coordinates which you must plot, correctly, on your map. Once this is done, you can start your navigation.

3. The only items you will carry are: pencil, protractor, map, score sheet, and compass.

4. You must navigate from the start point, through each intermediate point, in order, to the end point, and correctly record at least three points within 3 hours.

 


Land Navigation Night Course
(REFERENCE FM 3-25-26)

CONDITIONS:  During the nighttime hours, in the field, the candidate is given a compass, flashlight, magnetic azimuths, and distances between the points.

STANDARDS:  The candidate must navigate using the compass from a start point, through three intermediate points, to an end point, and record the position stake number for each point within 4 hours.  the following information must be annotated for record purposes:

1.  Start time.

2.  From start point to point 1:  degrees magnetic, meters, and position stake number.

3.  From point 1 to point 2:  degrees magnetic, meters, and position stake number.

4.  From point 2 to point 3/end point:  degrees magnetic, meters, and position stake number.

5.  Stop time and elapsed time in hours and minutes. 



The night course has similar rules:

1. Again, you must work alone.

2. You may not use a map.  You are given your start point. From there, you are given an azimuth and a distance in meters to your next point. This continues for the duration of the course.

3. Only red-lens flashlights are allowed. Use of any other light source results in failure. No larger than a 2 "D" cell battery flashlight may be utilized on the night land navigation course.

4. You will use a compass, but not a map or a protractor. You don't need them anyway.

5. The only way to determine distance is by accurately recording your pace count!!!

6. The only way to determine direction is with your compass!!!

7.  Remember to turn in the map and form when course is completed.  It's one of the steps to receive a GO.

8. You must navigate from the start point, through each intermediate point, in order, to the end point, and correctly record at least three points within 4 hours.


Map Reading and Land Navigation Lesson Plan

Map Reading and Land Navigation Quiz

Navigation with Map and Compass

Reading Topographic Maps

EFMB Lessons Learned

Land Navigation and Map Reading Slideshow 



There are many "tricks" to easily do land navigation  Some really work. Others do not. Many are illegal for the EFMB. Before trying any illegal "tricks", consider the fact that if caught, you not only get kicked off the EFMB site, but most likely your commander and 1SG / CSM will hear about it. Be honorable and honest.

Remember that if you thought of it, it has been thought of before. Everyone knows about the chem-light trick. A Chem-light on the course will get you a NO-GO. Chem-light will be utilized only to help graders find lost candidates. Don't memorize points from the day course or from practice runs through the lane. The same points are not utilized on the night. Also the signs are changes on the lanes frequently.

At night, graders will be out on the lanes. There are two reasons for this: one, assist injured or lost soldiers and two, maintain control of the lanes.

During the night course, remember that there are only two variables - your pace count and you azimuth. If used properly, your compass will not lie to you. If measured accurately, your pace count will be correct.

When measuring your pace count, keep in mind that you should adjust slightly if traveling uphill or downhill. The distance shown on a map is from point A to point B over flat terrain, "as the crow flies". You need to understand a little basic geometry to understand this.

For the day course, some soldiers use the IFR technique - I Follow Roads. That technique works extremely well in Bad Kreuznach, Germany, because the hard surface roads in the land navigation area are correctly shown on the map. At Fort Hood, however, this technique will cause complete failure. The roads in the area are dirt and change yearly. Fire breaks are not recommended either because they are changed over the years. Look at the date of the map to help you decide if you should use terrain association.